Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

What kind of repairs do you do?


As a Certified Piano Technician, I'm trained in all aspects of servicing your piano. I often fix sticking keys, re-glue or replace worn or broken parts, fix broken pedals, and make adjustments to your piano's action regulation, as well as voicing adjustments to the piano hammers.

I also provide more extensive services such as complete action regulation, action rebuilding, hammer replacement, and complete restringing and other restorative work.




Can you restring my piano? What about new hammers?


Absolutely! If your piano is a good candidate for restringing or other restorative work I'd be happy to help. Usually this kind of work is done on quality grands or uprights (such as Steinway, Mason & Hamlin, Yamaha, Bluthner, etc. or a family heirloom)

Reach out to me for more information and I'd be happy to put together an estimate for the work, as well as a timeline!

My email is ryan@legrandpiano.com and my cell is (818) 268-3232




My piano has some issues. Is it worth fixing up?


Almost always, I can bring pianos like this back to life with a Double Tuning and some additional repair and voicing work. Of course, I will confer with you about your options, along with their costs before proceeding on additional work. In most cases, not only is the piano brought back to life, but the cost is much less than replacing your piano!





What is your availability?


I usually take appointments Monday through Friday, usually from 10am - 7pm. You can also see my current availability during the Online Booking process, or contact me directly to find a time that works for us. My email is ryan@legrandpiano.com and my cell is (818) 268-3232




Do you have evening appointments? What about weekends?


Occasionally I will have rehearsal obligations or family commitments during the evening, but most weekdays I take appointments until 7pm.

I reserve the weekends for time with my wife and family. However, I do work into the evenings on most weekdays so I can likely schedule you in for an evening that works for you.

Contact me to work out a time that's best for you!




Where is the best place to put my piano in my home?


It was commonly thought that a piano should be placed on an inside wall. With modern houses that are insulated properly this should not be a problem. The piano should not be placed near any heat and A/C vents, or anywhere near moving air.





Tuning

What is your availability?


I usually take appointments Monday through Friday, usually from 10am - 7pm. You can also see my current availability during the Online Booking process, or contact me directly to find a time that works for us. My email is ryan@legrandpiano.com and my cell is (818) 268-3232




Do you have evening appointments? What about weekends?


Occasionally I will have rehearsal obligations or family commitments during the evening, but most weekdays I take appointments until 7pm.

I reserve the weekends for time with my wife and family. However, I do work into the evenings on most weekdays so I can likely schedule you in for an evening that works for you.

Contact me to work out a time that's best for you!




Where is the best place to put my piano in my home?


It was commonly thought that a piano should be placed on an inside wall. With modern houses that are insulated properly this should not be a problem. The piano should not be placed near any heat and A/C vents, or anywhere near moving air.





Why do pianos go out of tune?


The piano strings are several tons of pressure which is supported by the pianos rim, plate, pinblock, tuning pins, bridges, and soundboard. Anything that affects the position of any of these parts will cause a change in tension and make the piano go out of tune. When the humidity changes, air seeps into and out of the wood components of the piano, causing the piano to go out of tune. This is the most prevalent factor for pianos in good condition to go out of tune. A piano typically falls flat in the winter when the low humidity draws out the moisture, and then goes sharp in the spring and summer months when the air conditioning comes on. Temperature changes also cause a piano to go out of tune. Intense changes in temperature such as from direct sunlight, stage lighting, or opening a door or window during the winter or summer months all can cause rapid changes in the tuning. In new pianos, the strings have to stretch significantly during their first few years in a piano. It is not uncommon for a piano to sink a quarter step flat in just a few months due to the elasticity of the strings. The louder and more frequently you play a newly-strung piano, the faster the strings will stretch, and the sooner the piano strings will stabilize. In older pianos, the tuning pins can slip which cause the piano to fall out of tune. If the piano has been regularly exposed to changing temperatures and humidity the pin block will lose its tight grip on the tuning pins causing them to slip out of tune.




The piano isn't played often, so it stays in tune longer, right?


Not really, no. The biggest thing that makes pianos go out of tune is humidity and temperature changes. Although regularly playing the piano will influence the tuning, it is normally a very small amount in comparison.




How much does a tuning cost?


If your piano has been tuned less than 12 months ago, the standard tuning is a flat rate $125. If it has been longer than a year, or if your piano has gone significantly sharp or flat (usually from having your piano moved, garaged, or from large temperature and humidity fluctuations in your home) your piano will require a Double Tuning which is a flat rate of $175.

The tuning appointments also include minor repairs and adjustments such as fixing a sticking key or adjusting the pedals, as well as complimentary cleaning and dusting of the piano.

Of course, If I come across additional issue that will take longer than 20 minutes, I will consult with you before proceeding.

If you're ready to have your piano tuned, contact me or use my easily online booking system!





Repairs

Why do pianos go out of tune?


The piano strings are several tons of pressure which is supported by the pianos rim, plate, pinblock, tuning pins, bridges, and soundboard. Anything that affects the position of any of these parts will cause a change in tension and make the piano go out of tune. When the humidity changes, air seeps into and out of the wood components of the piano, causing the piano to go out of tune. This is the most prevalent factor for pianos in good condition to go out of tune. A piano typically falls flat in the winter when the low humidity draws out the moisture, and then goes sharp in the spring and summer months when the air conditioning comes on. Temperature changes also cause a piano to go out of tune. Intense changes in temperature such as from direct sunlight, stage lighting, or opening a door or window during the winter or summer months all can cause rapid changes in the tuning. In new pianos, the strings have to stretch significantly during their first few years in a piano. It is not uncommon for a piano to sink a quarter step flat in just a few months due to the elasticity of the strings. The louder and more frequently you play a newly-strung piano, the faster the strings will stretch, and the sooner the piano strings will stabilize. In older pianos, the tuning pins can slip which cause the piano to fall out of tune. If the piano has been regularly exposed to changing temperatures and humidity the pin block will lose its tight grip on the tuning pins causing them to slip out of tune.




The piano isn't played often, so it stays in tune longer, right?


Not really, no. The biggest thing that makes pianos go out of tune is humidity and temperature changes. Although regularly playing the piano will influence the tuning, it is normally a very small amount in comparison.




How much does a tuning cost?


If your piano has been tuned less than 12 months ago, the standard tuning is a flat rate $125. If it has been longer than a year, or if your piano has gone significantly sharp or flat (usually from having your piano moved, garaged, or from large temperature and humidity fluctuations in your home) your piano will require a Double Tuning which is a flat rate of $175.

The tuning appointments also include minor repairs and adjustments such as fixing a sticking key or adjusting the pedals, as well as complimentary cleaning and dusting of the piano.

Of course, If I come across additional issue that will take longer than 20 minutes, I will consult with you before proceeding.

If you're ready to have your piano tuned, contact me or use my easily online booking system!





What kind of repairs do you do?


As a Certified Piano Technician, I'm trained in all aspects of servicing your piano. I often fix sticking keys, re-glue or replace worn or broken parts, fix broken pedals, and make adjustments to your piano's action regulation, as well as voicing adjustments to the piano hammers.

I also provide more extensive services such as complete action regulation, action rebuilding, hammer replacement, and complete restringing and other restorative work.




Can you restring my piano? What about new hammers?


Absolutely! If your piano is a good candidate for restringing or other restorative work I'd be happy to help. Usually this kind of work is done on quality grands or uprights (such as Steinway, Mason & Hamlin, Yamaha, Bluthner, etc. or a family heirloom)

Reach out to me for more information and I'd be happy to put together an estimate for the work, as well as a timeline!

My email is ryan@legrandpiano.com and my cell is (818) 268-3232




My piano has some issues. Is it worth fixing up?


Almost always, I can bring pianos like this back to life with a Double Tuning and some additional repair and voicing work. Of course, I will confer with you about your options, along with their costs before proceeding on additional work. In most cases, not only is the piano brought back to life, but the cost is much less than replacing your piano!





Regulation

What kind of repairs do you do?


As a Certified Piano Technician, I'm trained in all aspects of servicing your piano. I often fix sticking keys, re-glue or replace worn or broken parts, fix broken pedals, and make adjustments to your piano's action regulation, as well as voicing adjustments to the piano hammers.

I also provide more extensive services such as complete action regulation, action rebuilding, hammer replacement, and complete restringing and other restorative work.




Can you restring my piano? What about new hammers?


Absolutely! If your piano is a good candidate for restringing or other restorative work I'd be happy to help. Usually this kind of work is done on quality grands or uprights (such as Steinway, Mason & Hamlin, Yamaha, Bluthner, etc. or a family heirloom)

Reach out to me for more information and I'd be happy to put together an estimate for the work, as well as a timeline!

My email is ryan@legrandpiano.com and my cell is (818) 268-3232




My piano has some issues. Is it worth fixing up?


Almost always, I can bring pianos like this back to life with a Double Tuning and some additional repair and voicing work. Of course, I will confer with you about your options, along with their costs before proceeding on additional work. In most cases, not only is the piano brought back to life, but the cost is much less than replacing your piano!





Why do pianos go out of tune?


The piano strings are several tons of pressure which is supported by the pianos rim, plate, pinblock, tuning pins, bridges, and soundboard. Anything that affects the position of any of these parts will cause a change in tension and make the piano go out of tune. When the humidity changes, air seeps into and out of the wood components of the piano, causing the piano to go out of tune. This is the most prevalent factor for pianos in good condition to go out of tune. A piano typically falls flat in the winter when the low humidity draws out the moisture, and then goes sharp in the spring and summer months when the air conditioning comes on. Temperature changes also cause a piano to go out of tune. Intense changes in temperature such as from direct sunlight, stage lighting, or opening a door or window during the winter or summer months all can cause rapid changes in the tuning. In new pianos, the strings have to stretch significantly during their first few years in a piano. It is not uncommon for a piano to sink a quarter step flat in just a few months due to the elasticity of the strings. The louder and more frequently you play a newly-strung piano, the faster the strings will stretch, and the sooner the piano strings will stabilize. In older pianos, the tuning pins can slip which cause the piano to fall out of tune. If the piano has been regularly exposed to changing temperatures and humidity the pin block will lose its tight grip on the tuning pins causing them to slip out of tune.




The piano isn't played often, so it stays in tune longer, right?


Not really, no. The biggest thing that makes pianos go out of tune is humidity and temperature changes. Although regularly playing the piano will influence the tuning, it is normally a very small amount in comparison.




How much does a tuning cost?


If your piano has been tuned less than 12 months ago, the standard tuning is a flat rate $125. If it has been longer than a year, or if your piano has gone significantly sharp or flat (usually from having your piano moved, garaged, or from large temperature and humidity fluctuations in your home) your piano will require a Double Tuning which is a flat rate of $175.

The tuning appointments also include minor repairs and adjustments such as fixing a sticking key or adjusting the pedals, as well as complimentary cleaning and dusting of the piano.

Of course, If I come across additional issue that will take longer than 20 minutes, I will consult with you before proceeding.

If you're ready to have your piano tuned, contact me or use my easily online booking system!





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Cell: (215) 839-6426
ryan@legrandpiano.com
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